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The Great and Eventful Update from Liberty Lake Day Camp

NJ Renaissance Faire at Liberty Lake

 

The NJ Renaissance Faire is a must see for anyone who wants to have a great time outdoors with friends and family.  While at the Faire make sure to try the fight circle where you get to swordfight against your friends.  Also, don’t miss the axe and knife throwing sponsored by our local Boy Scout troop and the fire dancers, both will keep you coming back for more. Come to the NJ Renaissance Faire and be completely dazzled by the extraordinary world complete with jousting, comedy, music, and a world known glass blower. For more information on the NJ Renaissance Faire call 1-888-846-8222 or visit their website for discounted tickets at www.njrenfaire.com.

 

Below are some pictures from this past weekend, enjoy!

 

 

     

 

     

 

 

 

Through its ten years in existence, Liberty Lake Day Camp has garnered a lot of attention from the local media – and for good reason! Below are some of the more recent published news articles featuring Liberty Lake Day Camp:

 

 

Here's a Good Fresh (Air) Idea

Kate Fratti, Burlington County Times, May 9, 2011

 

Andy Pritikin and I might be on the same wavelength. He is the director at Liberty Lake, a sprawling, wooded children’s day camp built around a 7-acre lake in Mansfield. Kiddie heaven, really. In his camp blog, Andy once referred to a worrisome phenomenon that bugs me, too. He was shoveling his driveway when he noticed there wasn’t a child outdoors to enjoy the snow day. No sledders, no snowman builders, no snowball fights or forts. Don’t kids play outside anymore?

 

It’s not the cold that keeps them cooped up, but our modern way of doing things. Now that it’s spring, I see the occasional kid in my neighborhood goofing off on a bike or shooting some hoops, but not the swarms of kids I grew up with. I don’t count it as progress. In my day, back when dinosaurs roamed, we kids were outside until our parents forced us home. We built forts, played army, tossed Frisbees, climbed trees. We suffered sunburn, bee stings and skinned knees, and picked up the occasional dose of poison ivy. I think we were healthier for it.

 

Click here for full article.

 

 

Liberty Lake Day Camp: A Special Place for Summer Fun and Friendship

Leslie Feldman, Suburban Family, March 2011

 

For the past decade, families have been sending their kids to Liberty Lake Day Camp to experience enjoyable activities and develop friendships that will last a lifetime. When Andy Pritikin opened the camp, located in Columbus, he wanted campers to be a part of a magical environment—a supportive community—that would give them a sense of purpose and importance in their lives. “When I was young, camp showed me that there’s a lot more outside of your backyard, basement and local recreation program,” he says. “I learned to play sports and to get along with others. It gave me a sense of responsibility and the confidence to persevere through the tough times that are inevitable in life. Camp is experiential education, and it’s the way that children were meant to learn: hands on. This is what we strive for with all our campers at Liberty Lake.”

 

Click here for full article.

 

 

How To Be A Good Camp Parent

Ellen Warren, MetroKids, July 2010

 

Trying to make things perfect for your children does not do them any favors,” says Andy Pritikin, director of Liberty Lake Day Camp in Burlington County, NJ.

 

Pritikin is bewildered by parents who teach kids that it’s okay to break rules. “When parents give a child permission to not participate in an activity such as free swim just because the child doesn’t like it, the child misses out on learning a valuable life skill. Instead, he learns how to manipulate a situation to his benefit.”

 

Letting your children go out on their own into a new environment and community of caring people is the best possible thing you can do for them this summer. They will remember it for the rest of their lives, and thank you for it when they get older!” says Pritikin.

 

Click here for full article.

 

 

Making Happy Campers: There’s a Method to Choosing The Right Summer Camp For Your Child

Loretta O’Donnell, Suburban Family, March 2010

 

With so many camps out there, parents may wonder if it’s better to choose one that offers a well-rounded variety of activities or one that’s more focused on a child’s particular interests, like a sports-specific or performing-arts camp. “Great question,” says Andy Pritikin, director at Liberty Lake Day Camp in Columbus. “I feel that we are in an age in which parents and children are deciding ‘what kids are good at’ by the time they are in first grade, and this is not a good thing. Kids should spend their summers trying new things, experiencing challenges, difficulties and safe risks, just like we used to do as kids.”

 

Pritikin notes that Liberty Lake offers an elective program that allows kids to participate both in a combination of group activities as well as those that cultivate a specific area of interest. “Would you want your young child getting a liberal and social arts education or choosing their major while still in elementary school?” he asks. “Sometimes we as parents can ‘over-parent’ to the point of cutting off opportunities for kids to be kids.”

 

Click here for full article.

 

Liberty Lake 2011 Newsletters

 


(click images to download & view)

 

 

   

 

Liberty Lake Day Camp - Camp Jams, Vol. 1 "Liberty Lake Jams Vol. 1"

CLICK HERE FOR SUMMER 2010 SPIRIT CALENDAR!
 
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The New York Times On The Web

The Rock Tour Comes to Camp for Second Summer

By ERIC DASH

Published: August 10, 2004 Read more »